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Turkey to reshuffle army earlier than planned after coup attempt

Turkey’s Supreme Military Council is expected to meet next week to discuss the army’s restructuring in the aftermath of the failed attempted coup, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said
Source: hurriyet

Turkey to reshuffle army earlier than planned after coup attempt

Turkey’s Supreme Military Council is expected to meet next week to discuss the army’s restructuring in the aftermath of the failed attempted coup, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said
Source: hurriyet

Ruling AKP to join main opposition CHP’s anti-coup rally in Istanbul

Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has decided to join the anti-coup rally to be held by the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) in Istanbul on July 24, a senior party official has said
Source: hurriyet

Tourism investor calls on sector to renew country’s image

Rixos Hotels Group Executive Committee head Fettah Tamince has called on Turkey’s tourism sector to take on the work of renewing the country’s image abroad in the aftermath of the July 15 failed coup attempt
Source: hurriyet

I tried to talk to intel chief on coup attempt night but I couldn't reach: Erdoğan

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said he failed to contact the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, on the coup attempt night, but he could not manage it, raising questions over an intel failure
Source: hurriyet

Thousands flock to Istanbul's Bosphorus Bridge to protest coup attempt

Thousands of people gathered at Istanbul’s Bosphorus Bridge to protest the July 15 coup attempt in the country on July 21
Source: hurriyet

Gülenists within Turkish Armed Forces defied orders from PM, HQ: Military

The Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) have released a new statement regarding the July 15 failed coup attempt, saying members of the Fetullahist Terrorist Organization (FETÖ) defied orders from Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım and the military headquarters
Source: hurriyet

President Erdoğan’s chief aide admits 'mistakes' but denies link to coup, Gülenists

PresidentErdoğan’s chief aide-de-camp, who was arrested as part of the wide-scale investigations into the July 15 failed coup attempt, has reportedly accepted that he made “wrong choices” on the night
Source: hurriyet

29 personnel suspended from duty in Turkey’s media watchdog

Twenty-nine personnel at the Radio and Television Supreme Council (RTÜK) media watchdog were suspended from duty on July 21 as a part of the ongoing probe into the failed coup attempt of July 15
Source: hurriyet

Turkey to temporarily suspend European Convention on Human Rights after coup attempt

Turkey will temporarily suspend the implementation of its obligations emanating from the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in line with the declaration of a state of emergency in the country
Source: hurriyet

Turkey to temporarily suspend European Convention on Human Rights after coup attempt

Turkey will temporarily suspend the implementation of its obligations emanating from the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in line with the declaration of a state of emergency in the country
Source: hurriyet

Turkish officers fleeing failed coup attempt go on trial in Greece

Eight Turkish military officers who fled to Greece after last week’s failed coup attempt went on trial July 21 for illegal entry
Source: hurriyet

Turkish soldier linked to Erdoğan hotel attack captured

A soldier linked to an attack on President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s holiday residence during the July 15 failed coup attempt was captured in southwestern Turkey on July 21, security sources have said
Source: hurriyet

Turkish pilots who downed Russian jet detained: Erdoğan

Two Turkish pilots who downed a Russian fighter jet in November 2015 on the Syrian border have been arrested and officials are looking into whether they have links to the Gülen movement, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said
Source: hurriyet

Time to save democracy, not stir more division

Former Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu, who himself was ousted by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan not so long ago, believes that the threat from the coup attempt on July 15 is not over yet
Source: hurriyet

I learned about the coup attempt from my brother-in-law: Erdoğan

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said that he learned about the July 15 failed coup attempt from his brother-in-law, as he added that he didn’t want to believe the news when he first heard of them
Source: hurriyet

Turkish fighter jets conduct op in Greek waters on 'missing navy boats': Reports

Turkish F-16 fighter jets conducted an operation to check reports that two “missing Turkish coastguard vessels” had appeared in Greek waters in the Aegean Sea, according to reports
Source: hurriyet

Interior Ministry refutes 'hijacked coastguard vessels' reports

Turkey’s Interior Ministry on July 20 refuted reports that two Turkish coastguard vessels were hijacked, saying that all of the vessels were on duty under the Coast Guard Command
Source: hurriyet

Alleged post-coup duty list revealed

A list containing the names of hundreds of soldiers with corresponding duty posts, allegedly naming their would-be titles if the July 15 coup attempt had been successful, has surfaced, however its top two slots were left blank
Source: hurriyet

Probe launched into all military judges and prosecutors: Turkish Defense Ministry

The Defense Ministry announced on July 20 that an investigation had been opened into all military judges and prosecutors, as a part of the ongoing probe into the failed coup attempt of July 15
Source: hurriyet

After coup bid, Erdogan seeks to ride national unity wave

One nation. One flag. One homeland. One state.

These eight words have been the key slogan of Turkish politics in the last years, strongly favoured by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as a symbol of national unity.

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What Putin wants but doesn’t get from Erdogan

 

putin and erdogan turkey's observer

 

By Leonid Bershidsky
The resurgent friendship between Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan is a strange thing: Putin knows what he wants from Erdogan, and he’s gone his half of the way, but he’s not getting it yet despite Erdogan’s exaggerated show of friendliness.

They had been on good terms before — until last year’s downing of a Russian plane that had briefly entered Turkish airspace from Syria. Putin demanded an apology, but the Turkish president was initially unwilling to make one, so relations between the two countries deteriorated into a state of cold war and Russia introduced sanctions against Turkey’s tourist industry, agriculture and construction firms. Erdogan, who has few friends on the international state, was apparently uneasy about this: He ordered his staff to look for a way to make peace, and they found a roundabout one.

The Turkish daily Hurriyet reported that the chief of Turkey’s general staff worked with a well-connected Turkish businessman who had interests in the Russian region of Dagestan to signal Erdogan’s readiness to concede. The message traveled to the Kremlin by way of the regional leadership. The response came via another circuitous route: It was Kazakhstan’s ambassador to Ankara who informed the Turkish leadership that Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev had spoken to Putin and the Russian leader would be amenable to accepting a letter of apology, should Erdogan write it. Nazarbayev approved the eventual text of the letter before it went to Putin.

Putin appears to have paid Erdogan back with no less goodwill. Not only did he accept a weakly worded apology, he was the first to call Erdogan after he survived the recent coup attempt, and there were even unconfirmed reports — never officially denied — that Russian intelligence had warned Erdogan about the coup.

And yet there was a visible difference of tone between the two leaders during their meeting near St. Petersburg on Tuesday. At the final press conference, Erdogan called Putin his “dear friend” no less than four times. Putin, cool and unsmiling, did nothing of the kind. His attitude may have been reflected in the housekeeping details. Though the two leaders ate off plates decorated with a picture of them shaking hands, the talks took place in the Constantine Palace’s Greek Room. Perhaps this had no significance, as the pro-Putin daily Komsomolskaya Pravda took pains to assure its readers — the ancient Greek theme runs through the palace’s interiors — but Turkey does have a strained relationship with Greece.

Putin’s apparent reservations about the reconciliation are more than the natural residual mistrust of a man who demands complete loyalty. The Russian leader wants specific results from his friendships, and Erdogan appears to have given him no promises.

The resumption of Russian tourism to Turkey is important to Erdogan, whose country, according to a Russian estimate, lost $840 million in the first six months of this year because Russians stopped coming. So is the end of the tomato and citrus embargo. Russia will be happy to build a nuclear plant in Turkey, as previously agreed, and it welcomes progress on Turkish Stream, a pipeline project to supply Russian natural gas to southern Europe via Turkey. All these matters were discussed at the Constantine Palace and mentioned at the press conference. But that’s not uppermost in Putin’s mind: The big game he is playing at the moment is in Syria.

The day before seeing Erdogan, he met with a key ally in the Syrian conflict, Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani. Details of these talks were not released, but the conversation could hardly have steered clear of the siege of Aleppo, where Iranian forces and Russian planes have been helping Syrian President Bashar Assad maintain a siege of a rebel contingent.

The rebels have just had some success in weakening the siege, if not in establishing a stable supply corridor with Turkey, where their weapons and provisions are coming from. The successful attacks on Syrian government troops, led by Jabhat Fatah Al-Sham, a group that has recently made a show of breaking ties with al-Qaida, were apparently enabled by strong outside support in the form of weapons, cash and supplies, originating in Saudi Arabia and Qatar but coming through Turkish territory. The convoys bearing the supplies kept moving unobstructed across the Turkish border after Erdogan apologized to Putin and after Putin called him following the coup attempt.

Erdogan’s “dear friend” Vladimir must have a hard time squaring that with the Turkish leader’s gushing.

The rebel forces in Aleppo are not likely to beat the Assad-Irianian-Lebanese-Russian coalition, if only because the strongest group among them, Fatah Al-Sham, formerly known as Al-Nusra, has no international support and isn’t being offered a place at the table at any peace talks. It uses suicide bombers to attack government positions, and it is a jihadist force. But Fatah Al-Sham’s relative success in recent fighting makes it harder for Putin to attain his goal of proving that there is no good alternative to Assad.

At the Constantine Palace, Putin must have told Erdogan — as he has said time and again — that Assad was Syria’s legal ruler and backing him was the same as backing Erdogan himself against coup plotters. But neither leader expected the meeting to lead to a breakthrough on Syria: The discussion of this issue was scheduled to take place after the press conference, since both Putin and Erdogan knew they’d have nothing to say publicly.

For all of Erdogan’s anti-Western rhetoric, fueled by U.S. reluctance to extradite his enemy Fethullah Gulen and the European Union’s refusal to budge on granting Turks visa-free travel, Erdogan’s interests are not aligned with Putin’s in Syria. He still wishes the rebels success against Assad — and against Syrian Kurds, whom Fatah Al-Sham is fighting. Gripes against the West may unite Putin and Erdogan as two bitter, ambitious and authoritarian rulers, but they are not enough of a platform on which to build a new alliance in the Syrian war that would effectively destroy Turkey’s affiliation with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

Putin would like Erdogan to cut off supplies to the rebels, but that may be more than the Turkish president is willing to do for his “dear friend.” He can send lots of tomatoes though, and Turkish hotels can cut great deals for Russian vacationers at the tail end of this season.

Bershidsky is a Bloomberg View columnist. For more columns from Bloomberg View, visit http://www.bloomberg.com/view.

 

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Ruling AKP to join main opposition CHP’s anti-coup rally in Istanbul

Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has decided to join the anti-coup rally to be held by the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) in Istanbul on July 24, a senior party official has said
Source: hurriyet

Tourism investor calls on sector to renew country’s image

Rixos Hotels Group Executive Committee head Fettah Tamince has called on Turkey’s tourism sector to take on the work of renewing the country’s image abroad in the aftermath of the July 15 failed coup attempt
Source: hurriyet

I tried to talk to intel chief on coup attempt night but I couldn't reach: Erdoğan

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said he failed to contact the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, on the coup attempt night, but he could not manage it, raising questions over an intel failure
Source: hurriyet

I tried to talk to intel chief on coup attempt night but I couldn't reach: Erdoğan

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said he failed to contact the intelligence chief, Hakan Fidan, on the coup attempt night, but he could not manage it, raising questions over an intel failure
Source: hurriyet